Find Your Seat
Photo by Jared Steinman
“Someday I hope to learn more about the sun and stars,
at that time we shall all meet up there, but for the present I prefer to
have the boundaries shown by our familiar rivers and mountains.”
Chief Washakie
Chief Washakie
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FREE Eclipse Viewing Glasses
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Fremont County Path of Totality Map

Find your ideal seat for the show

The northern and southern path limits are blue and the central line is red. You MUST be somewhere within the central path (between the two blue lines) to see the total phase of the eclipse. The eclipse will last the longest on the central line (red). Find an interactive version of the above map from NASA here and additional maps by GreatAmericanEclipse.com here.

The path of totality passes right through Wyoming’s Wind River Country!

The center of the eclipse path (where the moon completely blocks out the sun—totality—for the longest length of time) will pass right through Fremont County/Wind River Country, fairly close to U.S. Route 26. The path of maximum totality (the center line) runs fairly close to the Old Yellowstone Highway (US Hwy. 26 and the northern portion of U.S. Hwy. 287) between Dubois and Casper. Between Pavillion and Shoshoni, the path follows Wyoming Highway 134.

From the moment the moon’s shadow first “touches” the sun to the moment it fully reveals the sun after passing in front of it, a full eclipse experience lasts for about 2 hours, 45 minutes. Dubois, Whiskey Mountain, Crowheart, Pavillion, Shoshoni, and major parts of the Wind River Indian Reservation lie along the center meridian, and those communities will experience totality (the moon hiding the sun completely) for two minutes, 30 seconds at about 11:35 a.m. Several towns, including Lander, are also within the central path but closer to the edges and will have shorter viewing times.

Find the exact time and extent of the eclipse at any location in Wind River Country using this interactive map created by NASA.

Path of Totality Chart

Chances are High for Clear Skies

In August in Wind River Country, almost every day is clear.  Monday, August 21, 2017 will probably be no exception. Much of the county is over one mile (1,609 meters) above sea level, resulting in higher atmospheric clarity.
Historic weather data from the U.S. National Climatic Data Center show that Riverton is overcast only 8 percent of the time on August 21, and on average not even scattered clouds are in the sky on that date. We don’t think you can beat that record!
Sinks Canyon Popo Agie Falls Photo: WINK Photography

 

Vast Vistas and High Peaks

 

Wind River Country boasts many square miles of public lands in which to watch the galaxy’s show. Find a private viewing vista—perhaps even by climbing to the top of one of our 53 peaks over 13,000 feet including Wyoming’s tallest, Gannett Peak. Enjoy camping at private campgrounds, in State Parks, in the Shoshone National Forest, or on Bureau of Land Management lands. photo by WINK Photography

 

 

In a world where entire generations of people have never seen the Milky Way and less than 20 percent of Americans and Europeans can even see the stars in the sky at night, Wyoming’s Wind River Country is delighted to be the dark spot on the map.

 

If our night skies are this special, imagine how remarkable our night-during-day skies will be during the Aug. 21, 2017 Wind River Eclipse! See the night sky (whether at night or during the day) as it was meant to be seen: Away from the lights, out in the wide-open spaces with easy access, surrounded by nature, without a cloud in the sky.”

What to Expect

“Dusk’s colors will surround you on the horizon on all sides. The world will prepare for night in the middle of the day. The moon’s shadow will rush toward you, and the last bite will be taken out of the sun. Then sunrise colors will adorn the western sky as the world brightens again.” –Read more here.
A solar eclipse occurs when the new moon lines up exactly between the Earth and sun.  The moon is much smaller than the sun, but also closer to Earth, so both appear in the sky to be about the same size. The process of an eclipse takes several hours, but totality, which is only visible on a narrow path across the U.S. this time, the moon completely blocks the sun. During totality, day quickly darkens to a deep twilight. The moon’s shadow will rush across the landscape at 1,800 miles per hour. Stars and planets may be visible in the dark sky near the sun, but the horizon may show a 360-degree sunset. The glowing gases surrounding the Sun are ordinarily invisible, but become a visible corona. Depending on sunspot activity, the corona may be a compact display surrounding the sun evenly or may be quite visually impressive. Eclipse aficionados especially enjoy “Baily’s Beads,” small bits of sunlight coming through the valleys of the Moon, and the “Diamond Ring” seen just before and just after totality, in which a single bright spot briefly glows bigger than the ring.
We recommend these heartfelt and educational accounts of past total solar eclipses: On Not Totally Seeing a Total Solar Eclipse by Lavinia Greenlaw and “Total Eclipse” by Annie Dillard.
Super blood moon eclipse

Lodging, Campgrounds, Dude Ranches, and Outfitters

The eclipse is a personal and almost spiritual experience, and in our small communities, visitors can expect more serenity at their chosen viewing site than in a larger city. Wind River Country offers stunning views, room to breathe, and lodging that fits your eclipse experience. In addition to the packages and deals on this website, find more lodging and camping options here. Keep in mind, many of our lodging providers are small businesses, so if you have trouble reaching anyone or making a reservation, try back soon!  photo by Jennifer Lipps
Get in the Eclipse Spirit!

Request a Vacation Packet for Lodging and Things to Do in Wind River Country

Address:
Wind River Visitors Council
P.O. Box 925
Lander, WY 82520
Email:
media@windriver.org

One packet per household.